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Traditionalism v. Musical freedom


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#46 Edward Powell

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 10:55 PM

first of all, i think people generally automatically don't believe that any musician could be so versatile to actually have a serious knowledge of western, eastern, and middle-eastern musics. . . ---they must be convinced, but how do you convince people who have not the experience to judge?

Well I would say you have an impossible conundrum there.

If it cannot be measured (no experience to judge) nobody can see how good it is.

See threads about ideas and inventions before their time....


seems to me, IMHO, that if your knowledge base and groundwork is solid -- which, Ed, it undoubtedly is, Im SO impressed with your work on your site and on you tube -- -- then just relax and go for it. Music's not about proving what one knows, but about sharing the heart. You have great heart in your work too, trust that it will connect with people.

We have to trust ourselves. Its a hurdle I always fight, but when Im able let go, not worry about it, surrender to it, then it happens.

re: raga and blues --- fun possibilities. One word: Malkauns :D
I composed a straight teental composition in Malkauns , but the improvisation can get very bluesy, as i m doing it on the fretless electric. It's a fun juxtaposition, the strict classical form with a down and dirty bules timbre, lol.


thanks bro :( ...yes you are right, and i have a tendency to over-analyze...

Blues Ragas: Jog (ofcourse)
YES Mal Kauns!!!

what about Gujari Todi?!
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#47 Guest_neil haverstick_*

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 04:05 PM

Blues is an incredibly deep and profound art form, and also incredibly difficult to play correctly. There are also many many regional styles with their own "accents," so to speak, from the Delta styles of Patton, Bob Johnson, Wolf, Muddy and many others, to the East Coast fingerpicking of Blind Blake, Gary Davis and John Jackson, to the Mid/Southwest styles of Bob Wills, T Bone Walker, Barney Kessel/Herb Ellis and Count Basie, to the bop blues of Bird and Diz, to the way outside wailings of Coltrane...not to mention Hendrix, who was sort of the apex of electric blues guitar styles (and no one has surpassed him yet, I feel), and the British blues scene of the mid '60s, which produced such maestros as Clapton and Peter Green....and lots more besides these, that's for sure.

Most of my students are into blues, so I spend a lot of time teaching it...and RHYTHM is where it all starts. And, the variety of rhythms in blues astonishes me at times; being a good rhythm guitarist (or on any axe) is very difficult, and something most folks don't appreciate. Unfortunately, what many people hear, say, on the radio, is the most commercial kind of blues, usually very rock oriented, and lacking and sort of real depth. When a Stevie Ray comes along (and he could play), all of a sudden there are a zillion imitators, and things get really boring. Same thing happened with Clapton; there were many many folks copping his licks, at least the easy ones, and man it sucked. Hendrix was much harder to cop, and the few that tried bored the hell out of me, cause they didn't have the depth of rhythm that Hendrix had. It's all in the timing...what great blues players can do with the internal subtleties of the rhythms can take a lifetime to try and master...not to mention the intricacies of pitch as well.

I would recommend the Howlin Wolf "Rocking Chair" CD as a great place to start, it's easy to find...and Johnny Otis "Live at Monterey" (1970) is a masterpiece, featuring many different takes on blues, from Little Esther to Cleanhead Vinson, there's a lot happening. And, a plug, my new "Way Down by the Missisippi" blues tribute CD has a lot of different things happening, and there's plenty left over for another disc or 3. Blues is the shit, but you gotta find the good stuff...best...Hstick

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#48 Paul Shigihara

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 04:34 PM

Blues is an incredibly deep and profound art form, and also incredibly difficult to play correctly.

It's all in the timing...what great blues players can do with the internal subtleties of the rhythms can take a lifetime to try and master...not to mention the intricacies of pitch as well.

Blues is the shit, but you gotta find the good stuff...best...Hstick


thank you, thank you, thank you !!!

PS: currently trying to learn/play/work out blind willie johnson's 'dark was the night'... (on the surfreter)
if you think about the fact that he recorded this piece in the 1920's is just mindblowing !

#49 Newbie Brad

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 07:02 PM

Hubert Sumlin
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#50 Guest_neil haverstick_*

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 07:19 PM

BTW, my best blues student by far is an 18 year old kid; whatever I show him (of course within reason), he often grasps it immediately, and plays it...and what he doesn't know, he's all ears and wants to tackle it. Point is, it's totally non intellectual...he can just DO it, and sounds wonderful...he can get the subtle rhythmic things real quick, which I don't see very often...more later, and Hubert is indeed the shit...HHH

#51 Guest_TD fan_*

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Posted 15 May 2008 - 08:13 PM

Talradin Dabovich is great blues fretless guitar play too




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