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#1 rob

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 10:43 PM

Things are moving backwards.

http://news.thinkns.com/?p=1584

#2 jahloon

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 11:44 AM

Whatever next?
Play the blues guitar with your soul, but play the fretless guitar with your spirit.
Author of the book "Fretless Guitar The Definitive Guide" fretlessguitar.co.uk

#3 WolfV11

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 06:19 PM

Oh these silly things...

Well, fretted violins have been around for a little while. Shame to see Ned Steinberger making these, I thought he was more forward thinking.

I don't see these things catching on. They haven't before, and they won't now. It's like thinking that classical guitarists will start using picks.

Sucking all the microtones out though...what are they thinking. Even if you're not using microtonal pitches as a structural part of composition, their still vital transitionary tones even in 12 tone music.
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#4 rob

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 06:37 PM

Violin based looping musicians. They'll like the fretted bit for the pizzicato based percussive lines. But, frets with a bow does seem pretty silly to me.

#5 Kai

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 04:53 AM

frets with a bow does seem pretty silly to me.


Viola da Gamba; the Indian dilruba. (The latter has sitar-type frets. I have one, but it's currently residing with an Indian lady friend in SF.) Then there's the bowed Nyckelharpa, where keys are attached, to lower fret-like things in place of one's fingers, kind of like the hurdy-gurdy, but manually bowed. unlike the cranked rosin wheel you use on the h-g. But yes, a violin seems a crime to burden with frets.
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#6 rob

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 06:06 AM

frets with a bow does seem pretty silly to me.


Viola da Gamba; the Indian dilruba. (The latter has sitar-type frets. I have one, but it's currently residing with an Indian lady friend in SF.) Then there's the bowed Nyckelharpa, where keys are attached, to lower fret-like things in place of one's fingers, kind of like the hurdy-gurdy, but manually bowed. unlike the cranked rosin wheel you use on the h-g. But yes, a violin seems a crime to burden with frets.

I suppose it is true that there can be good uses for frets with a bow, but I can't get the image/sound of Page's bowed frets noise out of my mind.

#7 WolfV11

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 05:32 PM

Hmmm.. Fixed frets are bad. Especially when they're fixed in the same position that everyone's been using for 250+ years :P

:lol: I placed a comment on that page about sucking all the microtones out of the instrument....they removed it :D
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#8 Per Boysen

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 02:32 PM

I suspect that fretted violins, as a product, is not really targeting musicians that want the typical vibrato, glissando and freedom in intonation that comes with instrument as the violin and cello. They are probably just shopping for the "bow-attacks-string" sound character. For example, I've heard some folks that make music for film and media praising the fretted violin as a quick way to add some life to in-the-box orchestra productions they make with string orchestra sample libraries. Especially if the composer/producer comes from a guitar playing background.

I personally prefer an electric cello (fretless) for bowing but I happen to play in a duo with a guy that has a Togaman Guitarviol and he makes a lot of really cool sounds when bowing it, even though it is fretted. I think this Togaman is an excellent sounding instrument and I'm basing this not only on playing live with this guy but also on having mixed recordings of the Togaman. Here's a link to a video if anyone is interested:
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